Executive Coaching for Results

The Definitive Guide To Developing Organizational Leaders

Brian Underhill (Author) | Kimcee McAnally (Author) | John Koriath (Author)

Publication date: 11/01/2007

Executive Coaching for Results
The field of executive coaching is growing at an astonishing rate. Corporations are increasingly turning to coaching as an intervention, as it offers leaders and managers both on-the-job learning and built-in follow-up. But how can you make the best use of coaching within your organization?

Executive Coaching for Results helps this critical leadership development method come of age. This is not a “how-to-coach book”—there are already plenty of those—but rather a comprehensive guide on how to strategically use coaching to maximize development of talent and link the impact of coaching to bottom-line results. Underhill, McAnally, and Koriath draw on their rigorous original research (through Executive Development Associates) with Fortune 1000 and Global 500 companies such as Disney, IBM, UBS, Unilever and many others,
and combine that with their years of industry experience to advance the state of the art.

Executive Coaching for Results includes topics such as:
Integrating coaching into your organization's overall leadership development strategy
Locating and screening coaches worldwide
Developing an internal coaching program
Deciding which coaching assessments and instruments are appropriate to your situation
Measuring the impact and ROI of coaching
Following up after coaching

Throughout, the authors provide numerous examples from major organizations such as Dell, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, and Wal-Mart. Offering practical learning, best practices, and illuminating case studies, this is the first definitive guide to the effective use of executive coaching in the corporate environment.

 The first comprehensive guide to using executive coaching in
organizations

• Based on the authors’ rigorous original research with dozens of leading companies

 Includes extensive case studies, examples of coaching tools, advice on measuring ROI, and much more

Read more and meet author below

Read An Excerpt

Hardcover:
9781576754481

$34.95
(member price: $31.46)
Free shipping on all orders from the BK Publishers store.
Or find a local bookseller with Indiebound.

Other Available Formats and Editions

9781605098784

$34.95
(member price: $24.47)

9781576755440

$34.95
(member price: $24.47)
Bulk Discounts
Rights Information


Featured Books



More About This Product

Overview

The field of executive coaching is growing at an astonishing rate. Corporations are increasingly turning to coaching as an intervention, as it offers leaders and managers both on-the-job learning and built-in follow-up. But how can you make the best use of coaching within your organization?

Executive Coaching for Results helps this critical leadership development method come of age. This is not a “how-to-coach book”—there are already plenty of those—but rather a comprehensive guide on how to strategically use coaching to maximize development of talent and link the impact of coaching to bottom-line results. Underhill, McAnally, and Koriath draw on their rigorous original research (through Executive Development Associates) with Fortune 1000 and Global 500 companies such as Disney, IBM, UBS, Unilever and many others,
and combine that with their years of industry experience to advance the state of the art.

Executive Coaching for Results includes topics such as:
Integrating coaching into your organization's overall leadership development strategy
Locating and screening coaches worldwide
Developing an internal coaching program
Deciding which coaching assessments and instruments are appropriate to your situation
Measuring the impact and ROI of coaching
Following up after coaching

Throughout, the authors provide numerous examples from major organizations such as Dell, Johnson and Johnson, Intel, and Wal-Mart. Offering practical learning, best practices, and illuminating case studies, this is the first definitive guide to the effective use of executive coaching in the corporate environment.

 The first comprehensive guide to using executive coaching in
organizations

• Based on the authors’ rigorous original research with dozens of leading companies

 Includes extensive case studies, examples of coaching tools, advice on measuring ROI, and much more

Back to Top ↑

Meet the Authors


Visit Author Page - Brian Underhill

Brian O. Underhill, Ph.D. is an industry-recognized expert in the design and management of worldwide executive coaching implementations.  Brian is the author of Executive Coaching for Results: The Definitive Guide to Developing Organizational Leaders (Berrett Koehler: 2007).  He is the Founder of CoachSource, the world's largest executive-coaching provider, with over 1,000 coaches in 43 countries, and the Alexcel Group.  Additionally, he previously spent 8 years managing executive coaching operations for Marshall Goldsmith.

Brian's executive coaching work has successfully focused on helping clients achieve positive, measurable, long-term change in leadership behavior.  He has also helped pioneer the use of mini-surveys—a unique measurement tool to help impact behavioral change over time.

Brian's next article on Microsoft's coaching program will appear in the forthcoming "Coaching For Leadership, Third Edition".  He is an internationally sought-after speaker, addressing  The Conference Board, Linkage, and regional ASTD, SHRM HRPS, PCMA events.



Visit Author Page - Kimcee McAnally
Dr. McAnally's background includes over 20 years working in or consulting to businesses in the areas of strategy development, leadership development, executive coaching, training & education, and change management. She is a partner member of a consulting group, Claris Solutions. She holds a B.A. in psychology and masters and Ph.D. in Organizational PsychologyHer consulting practice includes developing executive coaching and leadership development programs, planning and designing transition strategies, facilitating workshops and strategy sessions, developing training and education programs, company culture change, designing organizational and employee assessments, creating new organizational structures, roles, and responsibilities; communication planning and strategies, improving group processes, and transitions for implementation of new processes and technology in companies. Dr. McAnally also operates a research organization providing industry shared-research, directed-research, and thought-leadership. Her research background includes academic research; practical industry-wide studies; written reports, articles, and publications.


Visit Author Page - John Koriath

John has been active in the field of executive development for nearly a decade. In various positions at Executive Development Associates, Inc. John has helped to create and deliver a community of practice networking experience to leaders of Fortune 1000 companies. John is drawn to projects, people, and relationships that seek to bring positive change to 21st century living. He approaches his work with a diverse set of skills and experiences gathered in a career as an educator, scientist, and therapist. John is a co-founder of the Turtle Island Project, a non-profit organization whose programs integrate principles of mind and body through the teachings of Native American rituals and ceremonies. John is a student and instructor in the martial art of Aikido. John also served on the faculty of Arizona State University for ten years where he taught in the field of psychology. During this time he conducted psychophysiological research, in part as the Flinn Foundation Fellow for Cardiovascular Research.

Back to Top ↑


Table of Contents

Figures and Tables
Foreword by Marshall Goldsmith
Preface
Acknowledgments
Introduction
Chapter 1--Understanding the Coaching Field
What is Coaching?
Purpose of Coaching--Why?
What Does Coaching Replace?
Who Gets Coaching?
Coaching Highlights
Chapter 2--The Importance of Culture and Leadership Support
Culture Counts
Get Leadership Support
Why Is Coaching Different?
Marketing Matters
Coaching Highlights
Chapter 3:--Linking Coaching to Leadership Development, Talent Management, and Human Resource Practices
Link to the Leadership Development Strategy
Linking to the Talent Management Approach
Linking to Leadership Development and Human Resources Personnel
Coaching Highlights
Chapter 4--Managing the Coaching Engagement
Prepare the Executive for Coaching
Leaders: Make the Most of Your Coaching, Sue Brown SJ Brown & Associates; Study Researcher
Prepare the Boss for Coaching
Don't Underestimate Matching
Watch for Stalls
Find Mismatches and Fix Them Quickly
Get Clear on Length and Frequency
Coaching Lite: the Wal-Mart Way, Heidi Glickman & Margaret Durr Wal-Mart
Reaching the APEX: How Agilent Leaders Benefit from Tiered Options for the Duration of Coaching, Christine Landon & Alison Hu Agilent Technologies
Thoughts on Duration, Carol Braddick Graham Braddick
Partnership; Study Researcher
Activities in Coaching
Know the Costs, But That's Not All
Chapter 5--The Toolbox: Instruments and Assessments
Why Use Assessments?
Gather Feedback
Expanding the Tool Box
Determining Instrument Policies
How to Manage Tool Selection
Chapter 6--Balancing Consistency and Flexibility
Be Consistent--Or Not
Keeping Coaching Alive: Nearing a Decade of Success, Pat Santillanes, Anthony Lamera
California Public Employees' Retirement System (CalPERS)
Add Consistency to Taste
Coaching Across 200 Companies: Providing a Systematic Framework, Respecting Entrepreneurial Cultures, Janet Matts Johnson & Johnson
Behind-the-Scenes: Managing a Global Executive Coaching Practice, Kimberly Arnold, Barbara Kenny (Dell, Inc.) & Steve Sass Alliance for Strategic Leadership
Chapter 7--Building an Internal Coaching Program
Consider the Opportunity
Compare Internal to External Coaching
The Positives of Internal Coaching
Internals as Coaches, Elaine Roberts & Kim Deutsch The Progressive Group of Insurance Companies
Internal Coaches at Intel, Lori Severson & Dorothy Lingren Intel Corporation
Challenges for Internal Coaches
Leader-as-Coach
Coaching Mastery at Bell Canada, Mary O'Hara Bell Canada
Coaching within Saudi Aramco, Kenneth J. Rediker, Ph.D. Saudi Aramco
Mentoring
The Debate Continues
Chapter 8--Measuring Impact
Start at Satisfaction with Coach
Include Impact Metrics
Ask the Boss to Assess
Follow-up with Another
Measure Return-on-Investment
Measuring the Impact, Deborah Swanson Sony Corporation
What Makes Executive Coaching Effective?, Mary-Wayne Bush The Foundation of Coaching; Raytheon
The Bottom Line
Chapter 9--The Art of Finding Qualified Coaches
Qualifications
Locating Coaches
Coaching Vendor Selection Process Janet Weakland, Bob Gregory and Cheryl Ramirez BP
Advantages for Using a Trusted Single Provider for Executive Coaching Sources Kristin Olsen Thrivent Financial
Screening Coaches
Unilever's Executive Coach Assessment Process Sam Humphrey Unilever
Does Certification Matter?
Chapter 10--Creating a World Class Coaching Community
Why It Matters
Stay Connected to the Pool
Dell's First Annual Global Coaching Forum:
Keeping the Partnership Strong Kimberly Arnold & Barbara Kenny (Dell, Inc.) & Steve Sass (Alliance for Strategic Leadership)
Building Community with Coaches Janet Matts Johnson & Johnson
Develop Coaching Talent
Know How Coaches Tick
Chapter 11--Life After Coaching
When Coaching Interventions Terminate Harris Ginsberg Chemtura Corporation
Renegotiate the Relationship
Boost the Fading Finish
Internals Can Continue Support
Keep Coaching Alive From the Inside Kevin Wilde General Mills
Beware of Dependencies
Self-Coaching
Keep the Measures Coming
Chapter 12--The Future of Coaching
Practice Standardization
Results Focused
New Forms of Coaching
Developmental Coaching William Hodgetts, Ph.D. Fidelity Investments
Regulation
Coaching through Technology
Industry Trends
Closing Thoughts
Coaching Program Design Checklist
Afterword by Richard J. Leider
About the Authors
About the Contributors
References

Back to Top ↑

Excerpt

Coaching Has Come of Age

Coaching has now come of age.

Given the rapid and extensive growth of this industry, it is not surprising that there is confusion regarding the field of executive coaching among corporations, coaches, and the executives who seek a coach. There currently is no official voice of the corporate coaching industry. Thus there is a clear, unfilled need among corporate coaching practitioners for a definitive source on corporate coaching.

Organizations worldwide are scrambling to make the most of this highly touted, yet somewhat mysterious, development intervention. What is coaching? What happens in coaching? How do you find good coaches? How do you know whether coaching has been successful?

Why Now?

Just within the past ten years the coaching industry has realized explosive growth. There are now an estimated 40,000 coaches worldwide,1 with an estimated $1–2 billion in yearly revenues. Many organizations are now making external coaching a high priority in their leader development strategies. Some are now five to ten years into an in-depth coaching implementation, serving hundreds—if not thousands—of their executives. Coaching has achieved a place as both a professional and a profitable business.

A 2004 Harvard Business Review article2 coined the industry the Wild West of coaching, in response to the prevailing mood of the time. Major organizations sponsored several industry-wide research studies to get a better handle on this promising methodology.

What explains this incredible growth? For one thing, the ever-increasing pace of change requires organizational leaders to develop quickly, and in the context of their current jobs. Traditional training programs are often set up to train or educate large numbers of people, but not to focus on a specific individual's development needs. Coaching offers an individualized development option without removing leaders from their work.

Second, the war continues for leadership talent. As the hunt to find and retain talent intensifies, many companies have viewed coaching as a way to compete in the marketplace to attract and retain that talent. Several organizational leaders we met said they would not still be at their companies if they hadn't received coaching.

Coaching in organizations grew with the rise of 360-degree feedback deployment in the early 1990s. Companies began offering one- or two-hour debrief sessions with an external coach to review the feedback. Organizations found that the feedback seemed to stick better, and leaders liked the opportunity to work with an unbiased external professional. More leaders, as well as many intact teams, found the process helpful for their development—and as leaders grew as executives, they recommended coaching to others.

Gradually, the standard coaching offer expanded to several sessions, several months, and eventually to 6- to 12-month assignments, and beyond. Coaches were a mixture of consultants and trainers, psychologists, and former leaders inside industry. Organizations began to target coaching for high-potential or high-performing leaders, rather than those experiencing performance problems.

Today, name-brand organizations such as Dell, Johnson & Johnson, Wal-Mart, and Unilever have large managed coaching programs serving countless executives and use pools of highly-screened coaches, in all parts of the world. Coach qualifications are now more consistently understood, and coaches operate in more countries than ever before. In addition to individual coaches, organized coaching networks, boutique firms, and large players serve the industry.

Coaching is also moving internally, with many organizations training internal practitioners to coach leaders. This idea is popular primarily for expense purposes and with companies who view their organizational culture as highly unique. Internal coaching is most frequently being implemented at the mid-manager and first-line supervisor level. External coaches remain the most popular solution for executives.

Coaching's rise in popularity impacts the use of traditional executive development methods. We found that in-house training, formal mentoring, and external education are at times being displaced by executive coaching. As a result, many trainers and consultants now deliver their specialized content with coaching included. For example, a time management class may now include follow-on coaching sessions.

We are also seeing more organizations looking to create a coaching culture. Companies are training their leaders to better coach others in work-related situations. As more organizations understand the results of coaching, they are offering leader-as-coach training.

The benefits include one-on-one focused development, specialized personal learning, confidentiality, and personal accountability for improvement. In addition, coaching provides leaders the opportunity to develop individual capabilities faster than most instructional programs can, and in areas where training programs do not exist. The main challenges for coaching remain its relatively high costs and difficulty in measuring results.

Generally, senior leadership's support and enthusiasm for coaching is on the increase. This can easily vary from company to company, however. We also found a gap between leaders receiving coaching and those willing to publicly endorse coaching to others. Perhaps there is still a stigma attached to having a coach in some companies.

Although coaching is still a rapidly growing field, many answers and best practices are now available to guide the development of the industry. The industry is not as out of control as some would suggest. The Wild West is being tamed (as it was in real life).

The industry's growth is showing no signs of slowing down. A recent Hay Group survey3 of HR professionals found that more than 50 percent had established a coaching program in the past 18 months. Coaching was estimated to be growing at about 40 percent per year. Another survey by The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development4 found that 79 percent of responding companies were using coaching.

In the following review of coaching, The Conference Board shares trends from its industry-leading conferences.

Conference Trends in Executive Coachin

Susan diamond The conference Board

Executive coaching has become an accepted best practice in the field of executive and management development, evidenced by the fact that two conferences and two seminars staged by The Conference Board are dedicated exclusively to the topic of executive coaching.

Begun in the early 2000's, the first coaching conferences attracted audiences seeking basic knowledge about an emerging field, which commonly focused on executives who needed fixing. As coaching evolved from a remedial intervention into a perk for C-suite and high-potential executives, knowledge and sophistication about coaching practices have increased. In response, The Conference Board added seminars and forums in 2004 to satisfy the interests of more senior-level practitioners.

Corporate presenters, Advisory Board members, and attendees at these events engage in active dialogue. They represent such leading public, private, and government institutions as Morgan Stanley, Colgate Palmolive, Bank of America, Dell, Prudential, Getty Images, Pfizer, Prudential, 20th Century Fox, Johnson & Johnson, H. O. Penn Caterpillar, McGraw Hill, McKinsey, Pepsi Cola Bottling Group, NASA, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, and the United States Navy.

New directions and trends in coaching best practices were striking in these exemplary recent presentations:

Intel—presented a study citing an ROI of its coaching program of more than600 percent;

Goldman Sachs—links coaching to specific business goals;

Weyerhaeuser—the key role played by coaching in a rapid transformation and new identity for the sales organization;

Wachovia—expects tight partnerships of internal HR and external coaching providers;

GE and American Family Insurance—developed an internal coaching cadre of HR and OD professionals;

MTV—increasingly recognizes the significance of adult learning and development theory in informing their coaching program;

Avon—as part of global talent management, it prefers only coaches whose work is results—guaranteed for high potentials;

Hasbro—links coaching to off—site executive development and strategy seminars held at Dartmouth;

Deloitte—now requires training in coaching skills for all of its partners;

ABN/AMRO—trains line managers from their business units in coaching skills.



Going forward, seminars and forums will continue to keep pace with trends in the field of coaching. Themes frequently mentioned on evaluations include:

What are the best coaching models? What are the implications of adult learning theory? Is there a physiological basis for good coaching methodologies? What is the connection between coaching and psychology?

How do you effectively introduce a coaching program within a corporation, ensure consistency in global coaching programs, and create a coaching culture?

The critical link of coaching to leadership development, talent management, organization design, and business strategy.

Coaching credentials.

When should internal coaches be used? In what situations are external coaches more effective?

How do you match coach to coachee? How do you measure results, including ROI? What about the issue of confidentiality?

Do women leaders require different approaches to coaching? Are there diversity and generational implications in coaching?



Based on our research, we know that executive coaching is not just a fad, but a permanent mainstay in the development marketplace. Sixty-three percent of organizations in this study expected to increase their use of coaching over the next five years. Nearly all the remaining companies plan to continue with their current spending, and only 2 percent plan to decrease their coaching budget.

The most encouraging statistic came from the customers of the process—the leaders themselves. Ninety-two percent of leaders who have been coached indicate they would hire one again when the time is right.

About the Book

This book will serve as the definitive guide and should be required reading for anyone responsible for designing and/or managing a corporate coaching program. It is written for leadership development practitioners, strategic HR, the talent management group, internal and executive coaches, as well as for executives and leaders seeking to make the most of their coaching experiences.

The vast majority of learnings and examples could be applied to any industry, company, or organization. Likewise, the examples and experiences could occur in large, mid-size, or small organizations; private or publicly held firms; government entities; or start-up or established companies.

This book offers a robust 3—D view of the industry, depicting the similar and contradictory perspectives of organizations, coaches, and leaders. No other publication on the market today can make this claim. This information is invaluable in its contribution to a holistic approach to coaching and the evolution of the industry. Although the book approaches the coaching field from the viewpoint and experience of the three authors, it is influenced by the research study and participation of organizations that have contributed feedback, callouts, and insight into their company's practices.

We invite you as the reader to join the author, coaches, and practitioners from leading Fortune 1000 and Global 500 organizations in a journey to understand the state of the art in executive coaching and extend its impact in the business world.

Yes, coaching has clearly come of age.

Back to Top ↑

Endorsements

“Finally, the best of the corporate executive coaching world all in one place!  This is the definitive guide.”
— Marshall Goldsmith, author of What Got You Here Won't Get You There

“Required reading for HR executives, practitioners, and all students having a serious interest in the development of leadership talent.”
—Dr. Laurence S. Lyons, founding director, The Metacorp Group, and editor of Coaching for Leadership: The Practice of Leadership Coaching from the World's Greatest Coaches

Back to Top ↑