Full Voice

The Art and Practice of Vocal Presence

Barbara McAfee (Author)

Publication date: 10/03/2011

Full Voice

Identifies five distinct vocal colors within the human voice and demonstrates how to put them to work in your life.

  • Offers a clear, tested, fun process for accessing the full range, color, and power of your voice
  • Identifies five distinct vocal colors within the human voice and demonstrates how to put them to work in your life
  • Accompanying free online practice videos demonstrate concepts and invite readers to practice out loud

Your voice says a lot about you. Based on the tone and expression of your voice alone, your listeners may make up their minds about you before they even process the meaning of your words. And if what you say is at odds with how you say it, they can miss your message altogether. As important as our voices are, few of us know how to use them to their full potential.

Full Voice offers a fun, tested method to harness the power of your voice to become a more effective and flexible communicator. Barbara McAfee identifies five distinct vocal tones or qualities-earth, fire, water, metal, and air-and explains how to cultivate each voice. You'll also discover how to use your voice to convey authority, passion, compassion, and other essential leadership qualities-and how to choose the right voice to ensure your message and meaning are understood. With online practice videos and real-life stories to reinforce the message, you'll experience an authentic shift in the impact your voice has on your colleagues, friends, and family.

McAfee's approach offers much more than a minor cosmetic improvement. It enables you to use your voice to support your intentions and aspirations, express who you truly are, and bring your gifts to the world. As you become more aware of your own voice, you also become a better listener, more attuned to what people are saying underneath their words. You learn to transform the ordinary act of everyday speech-the presentations you give, the meetings you lead, the stories you read your children at bedtime, even your casual con- versations with friends-into works of art. You'll discover how opening your full voice opens you to untapped potential, power, and aliveness as well.

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Overview

Identifies five distinct vocal colors within the human voice and demonstrates how to put them to work in your life.

  • Offers a clear, tested, fun process for accessing the full range, color, and power of your voice
  • Identifies five distinct vocal colors within the human voice and demonstrates how to put them to work in your life
  • Accompanying free online practice videos demonstrate concepts and invite readers to practice out loud

Your voice says a lot about you. Based on the tone and expression of your voice alone, your listeners may make up their minds about you before they even process the meaning of your words. And if what you say is at odds with how you say it, they can miss your message altogether. As important as our voices are, few of us know how to use them to their full potential.

Full Voice offers a fun, tested method to harness the power of your voice to become a more effective and flexible communicator. Barbara McAfee identifies five distinct vocal tones or qualities-earth, fire, water, metal, and air-and explains how to cultivate each voice. You'll also discover how to use your voice to convey authority, passion, compassion, and other essential leadership qualities-and how to choose the right voice to ensure your message and meaning are understood. With online practice videos and real-life stories to reinforce the message, you'll experience an authentic shift in the impact your voice has on your colleagues, friends, and family.

McAfee's approach offers much more than a minor cosmetic improvement. It enables you to use your voice to support your intentions and aspirations, express who you truly are, and bring your gifts to the world. As you become more aware of your own voice, you also become a better listener, more attuned to what people are saying underneath their words. You learn to transform the ordinary act of everyday speech-the presentations you give, the meetings you lead, the stories you read your children at bedtime, even your casual con- versations with friends-into works of art. You'll discover how opening your full voice opens you to untapped potential, power, and aliveness as well.

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Meet the Author


Visit Author Page - Barbara McAfee



Barbara McAfee is a musician, coach and consultant with over twelve years of experience in organizational change. She has brought her music to such clients as Best Buy, The Coca-Cola Company, the YMCA, Wells Fargo as well as to numerous wellness events, colleges, and private functions. She is the songstress for Meg Wheatley’s Women’s Leadership Revival Tour, travels and performs with Peter Block, and is active in the Heartland Circle’s gatherings in Minnesota and California. Barbara has produced 5 CDs as an independent producer working with the finest musicians in the Twin Cities.

Please visit the Barbara McAfee website.

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Table of Contents

Foreword by Peter Block

Welcome

Part I: Understanding Voice

One: Voice, Instinct, and the Oral Tradition: A Context for Voice

Two: Voice and Identity: Who You Gonna Be While You Do What You Do?

Three: Brain Rats: Addressing Fear

Four: Voice 101: How Voice Work, What Goes Wrong, and Ways to Keep Them Healthy

Part II: The Five Elements Framework

Five: The Five Elements Framework Overview

Six: The Earth Voice: Gut, Instinct, Authority, and Grounding

Seven: The Fire Voice: Passion, Personal Power, and Vitality

Eight: The Water Voice: Caring, Compassion, and Affirmation

Nine: The Metal Voice: Clarity and Focus

Ten: The Air Voice: Inspiration, Possibility, and Spiritual Connection

Part III: Integration

Eleven: Five Elements Framework Summary and Practice Guide

Twelve: The Case for Singing and Poetry

Thirteen: Voices Lost and Found

Fourteen: Our Journey in Review

Epilogue: One Final Word

Five Elements Reference Guide

Online Resources for Practicing Full Voice

Notes

Resources

Suggested Reading

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Author

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Excerpt

Full Voice

 

 

What is life? It is the flash
of a firefly in the night. It is
the breath of a buffalo in the
wintertime. It is the little
shadow which runs across
the grass and loses itself
in the sunset.

Crowfoot, Blackfoot
warrior and orator

 

chapter one

Voice, Instinct, and the Oral Tradition
a context for voice

Our voices carry a rich legacy. How we speak and listen today has emerged from the long unfolding story of human history. In her book The Four-Fold Way, cultural anthropologist and author Angeles Arrien suggests that indigenous wisdom and practices have an essential role to play in restoring our balance with each other and the earth. She discovered that voice—as expressed in song, sound, breath, story, and even silence—is a vital element in indigenous societies around the world. In many of these cultures, the voice is directly linked to the soul or spirit of a person. 1

The oral tradition is an enormous area of study, as is language development in individuals and societies. I must, however, make brief mention of these subjects as a way to root this exploration of voice in a deeper appreciation for our individual and collective vocal heritage. Let’s begin with your own vocal genesis.

You were paying attention to voices long before you were born. Your ability to hear was fully formed by the time you were a three-month-old fetus. You floated in a rich world of sound as well as in amniotic fluid. Your mother’s voice and heartbeat were most familiar, but you also discerned the voices of family members and other muffled sounds from the outside world.

At the moment of your birth, your first act as a distinct individual was a vocal one: you cried. That sound marked the doorway between your prenatal and postnatal worlds and announced your arrival on earth in no uncertain terms. The sound of your brand-new voice making itself audible in the world for the first time was the initial step on a vocal adventure that continues today.

Next you used your voice to communicate your hunger, discomfort, and frustration with distinct cries. If the adults around you were paying attention, they learned to interpret them accurately and respond to what you needed. Within the first days of your life, you also got busy decoding and echoing the complex world of sound around you. You began interpreting vocal sounds, facial expressions, and gestures long before you understood the exact words being spoken. Within a matter of a few months, your ears, eyes, brain, mouth, lungs, tongue, teeth, and lips performed a monumental task—transforming observations, random noises, coos, babbles, and squeals into your first words. Your voice was literally formed by “reading” the voices around you. Your ability to pay keen attention to vocal nuances and inflections is innately and fundamentally human. 2

Your ancestors passed these skills along to you. You are a direct descendant of good communicators. Being able to read voices accurately was a fundamental part of our human evolution. Those who got it wrong didn’t survive long enough to pass along their DNA. Spoken language is a relatively new invention—approximately 100,000 years old. No one can be sure how language actually emerged, but it most certainly was preceded by some system of expressive vocalization. Through eons of time our voices, ears, and brains coevolved increasingly complex linguistic systems for conveying information, establishing dominance, forging affection, organizing projects, and solving problems. Our deep heritage as oral communicators is still active in how we relate to each other today, whether or not we are consciously aware of it.

Most of us in the modern world live in cultures so immersed in the written word that it’s hard for us to imagine how vitally important the voice is in an oral tradition culture. Long before the written word emerged, the collective memory of a people was kept alive through time primarily through the power of voice. Each subsequent generation was responsible for carrying on the legends, mythology, history, genealogy, and social mores that defined a particular culture. This vast and detailed body of information had to be assimilated through a lengthy process of deep listening, vocal repetition, and correction that took many painstaking years to perfect. In the oral tradition, words and sounds carry powerful magic that can bring the rains, appease the gods, invoke healing, access mysterious realms, call the animals in for a hunt, and communicate with the ancestors.

When I heard West African wisdom teacher Malidoma Somé speak several years ago, he offered his firsthand experience in the contrast between oral and written cultures. Somé has earned multiple advanced degrees from prestigious universities in both Europe and the United States. As a young adult, he also went through a traditional initiation rite under the guidance of the elders in his village. Whenever Somé returned to his home village in Burkina Faso, he was struck by his “uneducated” brother’s ability to recite hour upon hour of story, song, and ritual from memory. Somé suggested that the increased reliance on the written word has radically diminished our ability to retain and recall large amounts of information 3 —a skill your ancestors probably took for granted wherever they came from.

One of the oldest cultures on earth—the Australian aboriginal people—offers another vivid example of how powerful the voice is in an oral tradition culture. Aboriginal people believe that their ancestors literally sang the world into being. Their song leaders memorized long and complex songs—the “songlines”—that passed in an unbroken line from generation to generation for 40,000 years. They relied on these songlines for many things in their society. Travelers who knew these songs were able to literally sing their way safely through the vast outback by following the songlines. Embedded in the songlines was the physical geography of the land, including sources of food and water. The songlines also related the spiritual stories and sacred sites reflected in each place. 4 From a Western perspective it is difficult to comprehend just how essential these songs—and the voices in which they were sung—were to the spiritual, social, and physical survival of the people over such a long period of time.

I recently saw an example of how the oral tradition might have been expressed in England during the Middle Ages. Actor Benjamin Bagby is featured in a film where he performs the epic saga Beowulf in Middle English while accompanying himself on an Anglo-Saxon harp. 5

Without the benefit of stage sets, other actors, dramatic lighting, or other theatrical conventions, the actor painted the terror and triumph of the tale through the power of his voice, facial expressions, and gestures alone. Witnessing this astounding performance reconnected me to the oral tradition that thrived in indigenous Europe for centuries. Many of these sagas, legends, and mythologies have been captured and preserved in written form. Nowadays you can find them in abundance at any bookstore or library and silently read them at your leisure. Imagine, though, what it would have been like to hear them from a powerful traveling storyteller who arrived in your small, isolated village once a year. Can you feel the wonder, terror, and excitement of being awash in fantastic tales dramatically spoken and sung into the breathless silence around the community hearth? Can you sense how profoundly those tales would impact you in the absence of books, television, radio, film, and the Internet?

Though the oral tradition cultures have been seriously diminished by modern life, remnants still survive in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas.

In many of the world’s religious and spiritual traditions, the spoken word is still a source of great power. All of the sacred texts from the world’s major religions were passed along through the oral tradition long before they were written down. These texts are still memorized and recited from generation to generation, usually with precise vocal inflections and nuances. Creation stories frequently begin with the divine speaking or singing the world into existence. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, God says, “Let there be light,” and light appears. In the Christian New Testament, the gospel of John begins, “In the beginning was the Word.” Prayers are repeated in the exact same way for centuries. Mantras are chanted to invoke powerful deities and access deep meditation. Jews recite the many names of the divine, and Muslims answer the call to prayer five times a day. Sacred words and songs are employed to declare intentions, offer blessings, and mark transitions. At any given moment throughout human history, this world has been wrapped in the sacred sounds of many peoples.

By contrast, we live our modern lives in a barrage of trivial language. Open your ears in any public place and you’re likely to hear yammering televisions, public service announcements, droning background music, and the incessant blabbering of people on their cell phones. Our voices grow louder in order to penetrate the din and drone of machines all around us. In a given week, we say more words to more people in more ways than our ancestors could ever imagine. Talk has become very cheap indeed, and our words, though plentiful, are often flimsy in meaning and inflection.

Cultivating vocal presence helps you reclaim the powerful legacy of the oral tradition in your life. As you rediscover the color and subtlety in your voice, it becomes a vehicle for your eloquence to enter the world. You take your place at the end of a long line of ancestors who sang their songs, spoke their stories, struggled to stay alive, and prevailed so you could add your voice to the chorus of humanity.

Let’s shift our attention from the lessons of our collective vocal heritage to the ways your voice is connected to your identity.

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Endorsements

“A book on voice that is more a book on the art of living through the voice. All true works of prose point back to the essential truths--to be true to ourselves, to express who we are in the world completely, and to communicate fully with others.” --Joseph Bailey, psychologist and coauthor of Slowing Down to the Speed of Life
“Barbara's words are wise and wonderful; the tools are practical and playful. If, indeed, ‘voice is the muscle of the soul,' Barbara offers a most pleasurable Olympic training opportunity. What a gift!”
—Jayne A. Felgen, MPA, RN, President, Creative Health Care Management, and author of I 2 E 2 : Leading Lasting Change
“This book is a gift and a call to reclaim the deep roots of our own life. It is an invitation to rediscover, embrace, and release the power of our unique voice into the world so our work can be vibrantly alive. It provides language, tools, practices, and stories that illuminate the journey. As an educator, I believe the inspiring ideas and messages in this book must be shared with all children so they understand not only the ‘song that is uniquely theirs to sing' but the deep ties between their voice and their calling and how they can bring them to life.”
—Stephanie Pace Marshall, PhD, Founding President and President Emerita, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy, and author of The Power to Transform: Leadership That Brings Learning and Schooling to Life
“I found
Full Voice such a delight to read! I never anticipated that learning about vocal presence could speak to me on so many levels. The metaphors and examples helped me visualize and connect to the message. And Barbara's intimate writing voice makes it seem as though she is sitting right beside me, talking with me.” —Lori Addicks, President, Larkspur Group

“Barbara McAfee leads us on a transformational journey in finding our true and authentic voice! This book is a must-read for anyone who wants to make a difference through the use of his or her voice.”
—James L. Roussin, strategic change consultant, leadership coach, and coauthor of Guiding Professional Learning Communities: Inspiration, Challenge, Surprise, and Meaning
“Every life is a journey into song. To find it, however, has often been a mystery that has involved a long, uncertain journey through a dark forest with no clear path to follow. Until now.
Full Voice is a magnificent guide that illuminates this path and makes this eternal dream possible. It helps us appreciate that the vulnerability of our voice is also the source of our greatest power, courage, and strength. Every voice is needed now. The world cannot evolve without it. Each of us has a ‘song' to sing. Without it, the world will be incomplete.” —Michael Jones, pianist, composer, leadership educator, and author of Artful Leadership: Awakening the Commons of the Imagination “I've worked side by side with Barbara for many years and witnessed the brilliance of her talents—her strong, soaring voice that she so skillfully uses to encourage others to find their voices. I'm so grateful she's written this book so that many more people may discover the gift of giving voice.” —Margaret Wheatley, author of Leadership and the New Science and Perseverance and coauthor of Walk Out Walk On
“The Tibetans speak of body, mind, and
voice , rather than body, mind, and spirit. This book offers wise guidance for opening our voices—and spirits—to their full expression.” —Eric Utne, founder, Utne Reader
“A practical and inspirational guide to how we can more fully bring our voice into the world. Barbara McAfee offers tangible ways in which we can strengthen and express our authentic voice.”
--Angeles Arrien, Ph.D., cultural anthropologist and author of The Second Half of Life

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