Pharmacy on a Bicycle

Innovative Solutions for Global Health and Poverty

Eric Bing (Author) | Marc Epstein (Author)

Publication date: 05/06/2013

Pharmacy on a Bicycle

This is a book about taking health care the last mile-sometimes literally-to prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering.

  • Offers a creative, entrepreneurial approach to bringing lifesaving health care to those who need it most
  • Features real-world examples of this approach in action around the world
  • Coauthored by a prominent health-care expert and a leading business professor and copublished by the prestigious George W. Bush Institute

Every three minutes, nearly 50 children under the age of five dies. In the same three minutes, 2 mothers lose their lives in childbirth. Every year, malaria kills 655,000 people, despite the fact that it can be prevented with a mosquito net and treated for $1.41.

Sadly, this list goes on and on. Millions are dying from diseases that we can easily and inexpensively prevent, diagnose, and treat. Why? Because even though we know exactly what people need, we just can't get it to them. They are dying not because we can't solve a medical problem but because we can't solve a logistics problem.

In this profoundly important book, Eric Bing and Marc Epstein lay out a solution: a new kind of bottom-up health care that is delivered at the source. We need microclinics, micropharmacies, and microentrepreneurs located in the remote, hard-to-reach communities they serve. By building a new model that "scales down" to train and incentivize all kinds of health-care providers in their own villages and towns, we can create an army of on-site professionals who can prevent tragedy at a fraction of the cost of top-down bureaucratic programs.

Bing and Epstein have seen the model work, and they provide example after example of the extraordinary results it has achieved in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. They describe the principles and practices involved in implementing it and explain how to apply it to overcome specific health challenges.

This is a book about taking health care the last mile-sometimes literally-to prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering. Pharmacy on a Bicycle shows how the same forces of innovation and entrepreneurship that work in first-world business cultures can be unleashed to save the lives of millions.

  • Offers a creative, entrepreneurial approach to bringing lifesaving health care to those who need it most
  • Features real-world examples of this approach in action around the world
  • Coauthored by a prominent health-care expert and a leading business professor and copublished by the prestigious George W. Bush Institute
  • Read the press release here; for media review copies contact [email protected]

Every three minutes, nearly 50 children under the age of five dies. In the same three minutes, 2 mothers lose their lives in childbirth. Every year, malaria kills 655,000 people, despite the fact that it can be prevented with a mosquito net and treated for $1.41.

Sadly, this list goes on and on. Millions are dying from diseases that we can easily and inexpensively prevent, diagnose, and treat. Why? Because even though we know exactly what people need, we just cant get it to them. They are dying not because we can't solve a medical problem but because we cant solve a logistics problem.

In this profoundly important book, Eric Bing and Marc Epstein lay out a solution: a new kind of bottom-up health care that is delivered at the source. We need microclinics, micropharmacies, and microentrepreneurs located in the remote, hard-to-reach communities they serve. By building a new model that "scales down" to train and incentivize all kinds of health-care providers in their own villages and towns, we can create an army of on-site professionals who can prevent tragedy at a fraction of the cost of top-down bureaucratic programs.

Bing and Epstein have seen the model work, and they provide example after example of the extraordinary results it has achieved in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. They describe the principles and practices involved in implementing it and explain how to apply it to overcome specific health challenges.

This is a book about taking health care the last milesometimes literallyto prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering. Pharmacy on a Bicycle shows how the same forces of innovation and entrepreneurship that work in first-world business cultures can be unleashed to save the lives of millions.

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Book Details
Overview

This is a book about taking health care the last mile-sometimes literally-to prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering.

  • Offers a creative, entrepreneurial approach to bringing lifesaving health care to those who need it most
  • Features real-world examples of this approach in action around the world
  • Coauthored by a prominent health-care expert and a leading business professor and copublished by the prestigious George W. Bush Institute

Every three minutes, nearly 50 children under the age of five dies. In the same three minutes, 2 mothers lose their lives in childbirth. Every year, malaria kills 655,000 people, despite the fact that it can be prevented with a mosquito net and treated for $1.41.

Sadly, this list goes on and on. Millions are dying from diseases that we can easily and inexpensively prevent, diagnose, and treat. Why? Because even though we know exactly what people need, we just can't get it to them. They are dying not because we can't solve a medical problem but because we can't solve a logistics problem.

In this profoundly important book, Eric Bing and Marc Epstein lay out a solution: a new kind of bottom-up health care that is delivered at the source. We need microclinics, micropharmacies, and microentrepreneurs located in the remote, hard-to-reach communities they serve. By building a new model that "scales down" to train and incentivize all kinds of health-care providers in their own villages and towns, we can create an army of on-site professionals who can prevent tragedy at a fraction of the cost of top-down bureaucratic programs.

Bing and Epstein have seen the model work, and they provide example after example of the extraordinary results it has achieved in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. They describe the principles and practices involved in implementing it and explain how to apply it to overcome specific health challenges.

This is a book about taking health care the last mile-sometimes literally-to prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering. Pharmacy on a Bicycle shows how the same forces of innovation and entrepreneurship that work in first-world business cultures can be unleashed to save the lives of millions.

  • Offers a creative, entrepreneurial approach to bringing lifesaving health care to those who need it most
  • Features real-world examples of this approach in action around the world
  • Coauthored by a prominent health-care expert and a leading business professor and copublished by the prestigious George W. Bush Institute
  • Read the press release here; for media review copies contact [email protected]

Every three minutes, nearly 50 children under the age of five dies. In the same three minutes, 2 mothers lose their lives in childbirth. Every year, malaria kills 655,000 people, despite the fact that it can be prevented with a mosquito net and treated for $1.41.

Sadly, this list goes on and on. Millions are dying from diseases that we can easily and inexpensively prevent, diagnose, and treat. Why? Because even though we know exactly what people need, we just cant get it to them. They are dying not because we can't solve a medical problem but because we cant solve a logistics problem.

In this profoundly important book, Eric Bing and Marc Epstein lay out a solution: a new kind of bottom-up health care that is delivered at the source. We need microclinics, micropharmacies, and microentrepreneurs located in the remote, hard-to-reach communities they serve. By building a new model that "scales down" to train and incentivize all kinds of health-care providers in their own villages and towns, we can create an army of on-site professionals who can prevent tragedy at a fraction of the cost of top-down bureaucratic programs.

Bing and Epstein have seen the model work, and they provide example after example of the extraordinary results it has achieved in Africa, Asia, and Latin America. They describe the principles and practices involved in implementing it and explain how to apply it to overcome specific health challenges.

This is a book about taking health care the last milesometimes literallyto prevent widespread, unnecessary, and easily avoided death and suffering. Pharmacy on a Bicycle shows how the same forces of innovation and entrepreneurship that work in first-world business cultures can be unleashed to save the lives of millions.

About the Authors
Table of Contents
Excerpt

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