The Sisters Are Alright (Audio)

Tamara Winfrey Harris (Author) | Tamberla Perry (Narrated by)

Publication date: 07/07/2015

The Sisters Are Alright (Audio)
What's wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!

The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti–black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves.

When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra—servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel—followed close behind. In the '60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and hit song lyrics. Emancipation may have happened more than 150 years ago, but America still won't let a sister be free from this coven of caricatures.

Tamara Winfrey Harris delves into marriage, motherhood, health, sexuality, beauty, and more, taking sharp aim at pervasive stereotypes about black women. She counters warped prejudices with the straight-up truth about being a black woman in America. “We have facets like diamonds,” she writes. “The trouble is the people who refuse to see us sparkling.”

Read more and meet author below



Audio Book:
9781626566514

$15.95
(member price: $11.17)
Free shipping on all orders from the BK Publishers store.
Or find a local bookseller with Indiebound.
Bulk Discounts
Rights Information


Featured Books



Compassionate Counterterrorism

Islamist terrorism is not about religion, says Leena Al Olaimy, an Arab Muslim, Dalai Lama Fellow, and social entrepreneur. She identifies...

Invisible Martyrs (Audio)

“This is an extraordinary book, written by an extraordinary woman. Qazi is a master storyteller, capturing the emotion as well as...

More About This Product

Overview

What's wrong with black women? Not a damned thing!

The Sisters Are Alright exposes anti–black-woman propaganda and shows how real black women are pushing back against distorted cartoon versions of themselves.

When African women arrived on American shores, the three-headed hydra—servile Mammy, angry Sapphire, and lascivious Jezebel—followed close behind. In the '60s, the Matriarch, the willfully unmarried baby machine leeching off the state, joined them. These stereotypes persist to this day through newspaper headlines, Sunday sermons, social media memes, cable punditry, government policies, and hit song lyrics. Emancipation may have happened more than 150 years ago, but America still won't let a sister be free from this coven of caricatures.

Tamara Winfrey Harris delves into marriage, motherhood, health, sexuality, beauty, and more, taking sharp aim at pervasive stereotypes about black women. She counters warped prejudices with the straight-up truth about being a black woman in America. “We have facets like diamonds,” she writes. “The trouble is the people who refuse to see us sparkling.”

Back to Top ↑

Meet the Author & Other Product Contributors


Visit Author Page - Tamara Winfrey Harris

Tamara Winfrey Harris is a writer, specializing in the intersection of current events, politics, and pop culture with race and gender. The Sisters Are Alright: Changing the Broken Narrative of Black Women in America is her first book.

Tamara’s work has appeared in the Chicago Sun-Times, In These Times, Ms., and Bitch magazines and online at The American Prospect, Salon, The Guardian, Newsweek/Daily Beast, Jane Pratt’s XO Jane, The Huffington Post, Psychology Today, and Clutch magazineHer writing career began with the personal blog What Tami Said. Her writing there has been referenced by New York magazine and a host of sites dedicated to feminism and race. Tamara has appeared as an expert in media, including on NPR’s Weekend Edition. And she was also a senior editor at Racialicious, a blog devoted to conversations about race. 

Tamara graduated with a BA degree from the Greenlee School of Journalism at Iowa State University. She is also a graduate of the Maynard Institute’s Editing Program for Minority Journalists. She has more than twenty years of experience in journalism, public relations, and marketing, and she teaches public speaking to college students. She is a proud member of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.



Narrated by Tamberla Perry

Back to Top ↑


Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: The Trouble with Black Women

Chapter 1: Beauty - Pretty for a Black Girl
Chapter 2: Sex - Bump and Grind
Chapter 3: Marriage - Witches, Thornbacks and Sapphires
Chapter 4: Motherhood - Between Mammy and a Hard Place
Chapter 5: Anger - Twist and Shout
Chapter 6: Strength - Precious Mettle
Chapter 7:Health - Fat, Sick and Crazy

Epilogue: The Sisters Are Alright

Notes
Index
About the Author


Back to Top ↑

Endorsements

Winfrey-Harris wants to set the record straight on the lives of black women in America. Through her own recollections and interviews with other, mostly middle-class, black women, she shows the obstacles they fight against, the flak they receive—including from black men—and how well many of them are doing despite it all. This energetic, passionate, and progressive mission statement illuminates old stereotypes that continue to dog black women today: servile, self-sacrificing Mammy; emasculating Sapphire; licentious Jezebel; and the post-1960s image of the Matriarch, a baby-producing single mom on welfare. More poignantly, Winfrey-Harris shows how negative perceptions cause African-American women to “hold their tongues,” “deny their sexuality,” and despise their appearances. At the same time, she emphasizes the extent to which black women are now directing their own lives and overcoming the race and gender biases so embedded in the culture. To wit, African-American women have the highest workforce participation rate among all American women, and in 2013, 1.1 million owned their own businesses. Jamyla Bennu, an entrepreneur featured in the book, founded Oyin Handmade, a company aimed at showing black women how to take care of and celebrate their hair. Winfrey-Harris amplifies the voices of African-American women speaking for themselves, and the results are powerful, relevant, and affirming. (July)
—Publishers Weekly

“This book is a gift. With just the right mix of sister wit, statistical information, and a few well-timed rhetorical side-eyes, 
The Sisters Are Alright rushes in to save black women from the stereotypes that threaten to dull our shine.”  
—Brittney Cooper, PhD, Assistant Professor of Women's and Gender Studies and Africana Studies, Rutgers University

“Winfrey Harris [digs] into the project of remaking representations of black women as they truly are—joyfully diverse, indelibly complex, and powerful architects of their own narratives."
—Andi Zeisler, cofounder and Editorial/Creative Director, Bitch Media

“Winfrey Harris sets the record straight. This is a love letter to all the sisters—beautifully human and gorgeously flawed. Reading this book I felt seen, heard, and deeply understood. This is self-care between two covers.”
—Tayari Jones, author of Silver Sparrow

Back to Top ↑