Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go 2nd Edition

Career Conversations Organizations Need and Employees Want

Beverly Kaye (Author) | Julie Winkle Giulioni (Author)

Publication date: 01/15/2019

Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go
The new edition of the bestselling employee development classic includes advice on talent retention in the gig economy, and a new chapter on creating a career development culture in your organization.

Study after study confirms that career development is the single most powerful tool managers have for driving retention, engagement, productivity, and results. But most managers feel like they just don't have time for more meetings. This book offers a better way: frequent, short conversations with employees about their career goals that can be integrated seamlessly into the normal course of business.

Beverly Kaye and Julie Winkle Giulioni identify three broad types of conversations that will increase employees' awareness of their strengths, weaknesses, and interests; point out where their organization and their industry are headed; and help them pull all of that together to design their personalized career plans. And the new chapter includes an assessment so you can measure how well your current culture supports employee development—and how to improve it.

Read more and meet author below

Read An Excerpt

Paperback:
9781523097500

$18.95
(member price: $17.06)
Free shipping on all orders from the BK Publishers store.
Or find a local bookseller with Indiebound.

Additional Links:

Endorsements

Other Available Formats and Editions

9781523097517

$18.95
(member price: $13.27)

9781523097524

$18.95
(member price: $13.27)
Bulk Discounts
Rights Information


Featured Books



More About This Product

Overview

The new edition of the bestselling employee development classic includes advice on talent retention in the gig economy, and a new chapter on creating a career development culture in your organization.

Study after study confirms that career development is the single most powerful tool managers have for driving retention, engagement, productivity, and results. But most managers feel like they just don't have time for more meetings. This book offers a better way: frequent, short conversations with employees about their career goals that can be integrated seamlessly into the normal course of business.

Beverly Kaye and Julie Winkle Giulioni identify three broad types of conversations that will increase employees' awareness of their strengths, weaknesses, and interests; point out where their organization and their industry are headed; and help them pull all of that together to design their personalized career plans. And the new chapter includes an assessment so you can measure how well your current culture supports employee development—and how to improve it.

Back to Top ↑

Meet the Authors


Visit Author Page - Beverly Kaye
Beverly Kaye is founder and co-CEO of Career Systems International, specializing in engagement, retention, and development. She is a well-known keynote speaker, writer, and developer of innovative learning tools.

Visit Author Page - Julie Winkle Giulioni
Julie Winkle Giulioni is cofounder and principal of DesignArounds, a bicoastal consulting and instructional design firm specializing in leadership, sales, and customer service.

Back to Top ↑


Excerpt

Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go

Image

Spending forty-sixty-eighty hours somewhere each week . . . I want it to mean something. I want to feel like I’m moving forward somehow. If I can’t grow here, I’ve gotta look elsewhere.

—An employee (perhaps yours)

The decision to assume a management role in today’s workplace comes with a front-row seat to some of the greatest business challenges of our time. Day in and day out, you must

Do more with less. It’s become cliché, but it permeates life at work. You’ve likely become a master at finding ways to reduce costs, time, and other resources below levels you ever imagined were possible.

Navigate unprecedented uncertainty and complexity. The unknowns outnumber the knowns today. Yet others look to you for clarity and direction in an increasingly unpredictable environment.

Meet ever-expanding expectations. Every quarter, you’re asked to do a little (or a lot) more. Bigger sales. Greater numbers of service interactions. More projects. Higher scores.

Continuously improve quality. Good enough isn’t. Given the competition in today’s global market, perfection is the standard—until it’s met and you have to do even better.

Deliver the next big thing. Most organizations believe that if they’re not moving forward, they’re sliding backward. Innovation gets its picture on business magazine covers because it represents the promise of greater success.

And, no matter how long, hard, or smart you work, you can’t do all of this alone. Success depends upon tapping the very best that everyone has to offer. (By everyone, we’re not just talking about employees— because the workforce has dramatically grown to include gig workers, contingent support, contractors and consultants, interns and even externs.) So today, your success rests upon finding ways to continuously expand everyone’s capacity, engagement, and ability to contribute to the organization.

Image

Study after study confirms that best-in-class managers—those who consistently develop the most capable, flexible, and engaged teams able to drive exceptional business results—all share one quality: they make career development a priority.

A “HISTORY” LESSON

Even during challenging economic times, your best and brightest have options. Failing to help them grow can lead employees to take their talents elsewhere. They become “history.” But what can be equally damaging as this talent drain are the employees who stay and become disengaged. Their bodies show up for work every day but their commitment has quit.

So, if career development is a tool that can deliver what organizations need most—productivity gains, expense reduction, retention, quality improvements, innovation, and bottom-line results—why isn’t everyone using it?

DEFINING TERMS

Perhaps it’s frequently forgotten because the term career development strikes fear into managers’ hearts.

WHAT ABOUT YOU?

Take a moment to think about what career development means to you? What’s involved? What’s your role?

Whatever your answer, we’ll bet that ours is simpler. You see, many managers are intimidated by or steer clear of career development because they have a mistaken, outdated, or overwhelming definition of the term.

So try this definition on for size:

Career development
is nothing more than
helping others grow.
And nothing less.

Helping others grow can take a nearly unlimited number of forms. On one end of the continuum, you help employees prepare for and move to new or expanded roles in obvious and visible ways. But far more frequently, growth shows up on the other end of the continuum, in small, subtle ways that quietly create greater challenge, interest, and satisfaction in a job.

The problem is that too often, career development evokes images of forms, checklists, and deadlines. And let’s be honest—the organization needs you to comply with these processes and systems to support important human resources planning work. But administrative details are not career development. Unfortunately, these artifacts too frequently overshadow the true art of development.

Genuine, meaningful, and sustainable career development occurs through the human act of conversation.

Whether it’s a formal individual development planning (IDP) meeting or an on-the-fly connection, it’s the quality of the conversation that matters most to employees. That’s how they judge your performance and their development. That’s also how they make the decision to go or stay—or to stay and disengage.

So, if it really is as simple as just talking to people, why isn’t career development a more common feature of the organizational landscape?

Image

IMMOBILIZING MYTHS

Over the years, managers—by sharing oral history and spinning lore— have created and continue to propagate several myths. And these myths (read: reasons or excuses) keep them from having the very career conversations their employees want. Which are familiar to you?

Myth 1 — There is simply not enough time.

No one will argue that time is among the scarcest resources available to managers today. But let’s get real. You’re having conversations already— probably all day long. What if you could redirect some of that time and some of those conversations to focus on careers?

Myth 2 — If I don’t talk about it, they may not think about it and the status quo will be safe.

Why invite problems? Developing people could lead them to leave and upset the balance of your well-running department, right? Wrong. Employees have growth on their minds—whether you address it or not. Withholding these conversations is a greater danger to the status quo than engaging in them.

Myth 3 — Since employees need to own their careers, it’s not my job.

No one will argue that managers own the development of their employees’ careers. Employees do. But that doesn’t mean that managers are completely off the hook. You have an essential role in helping and supporting others to take responsibility. And that role plays out in large part through conversation.

Myth 4 — Everyone wants more, bigger, or better: promotions, raises, prestige, power.

If you believe this one, you likely view career development as a confounding no-win situation. Because these things you imagine others want are in woefully short supply, it’s understandable that many managers would avoid a potentially disappointing and demoralizing conversation. But based on our research, the fundamental assumption behind this response is patently inaccurate. When asked about what they want to get out of a career conversation with their managers, the number-one response from employees is “ways to use my talents creatively.”

Myth 5 — Development efforts are best concentrated on high potentials, many of whom already have plans in place.

This one’s a cop-out. You can indeed see a significant return on the development you invest in your high potentials. But they make up only about 10 percent of your population—maybe less. You probably have another 10 percent of marginal performers who are on a very different kind of plan—hopefully fewer. But what about the 80 percent in between—the massive middle responsible for doing the bulk of the work? Imagine what even a small investment in their development might yield.

If you’re like most managers, a few of these myths likely make sense to you. Dog-ear or bookmark this page and come back to it after you’ve completed the book. We predict that when you are introduced to a different way of looking at your role, you may also look at career development and these myths a little differently.

But, until then, remember this: growing the business means growing people. Forget that—and the rest is history.

What IF . . .

Image   you reframed how you think about career development?

Image   growth really was as simple as conversing with employees?

Image   managers could break through the myths that undermine their success and their employees’ growth?

Back to Top ↑

Endorsements

“Filled with great examples, questions, and real-world approaches that fit into the workflow, this book brings a much-needed simplicity and personal touch back to career development.”
—David Rodriguez, Executive Vice President and Chief Human Resources Officer, Marriott International
 
“Employees crave authentic conversations about their careers. Too frequently, managers shy away or simply don't make the time. Bev and Julie remind us that it can be as simple as asking good questions—and they show us how with tips, examples, and suggestions that build confidence and competence.”
—Louise Keefe, Global Senior Leader, Organization Effectiveness, Eaton
 
“Every manager will find this short book to be long on practical ways to make career development happen.” 
—Jack Zenger, CEO, Zenger Folkman, and coauthor of the bestselling The Extraordinary Leader and The Extraordinary Coach 
 
“This book is an essential manual for managers and mentors who want to achieve success. Career planning does not have to be complicated or intimidating. The authors break it down into remarkably simple conversation topics with open-ended questions. The examples that have been threaded throughout are spot on and valuable. This will be an often-used and dog-eared resource on every desk!”
—Bill Meeker, Chief Energy and Human Resources Officer, Diversey
 
“At United Health Group, our company growth depends on the growth of our employees. When employees feel they can meet their career goals, that fuels engagement—one of the key drivers of our success. Bev and Julie hit the bull's-eye by providing a compelling book that speaks to the everyday life of a manager. What a wonderful resource!”
—Wendy Bloom, Senior Director, Talent Strategy, United Healthcare
 
“Beverly and Julie have a remarkable gift of turning an important and complex topic into useful and simple ideas and practices. Their work will help leaders wisely invest in their employees and employees take responsibility for their personal development.” 
—Dave Ulrich, Professor of Business Administration, Ross School of Business, University of Michigan 
 
“Deceptively simple. Absolutely relevant. Bev and Julie demystify career development and give managers the key to unlocking the potential around them.” 
—Heidi Brandow, Director, Global Learning and Development, Tesla, Inc.
 
“Life and business are all about where you pay attention. Pay attention to the growth of your people . . . and they will grow your business. The authors do a great job in spelling out the how-tos!”
—Chip Conley, author of [email protected] and Strategic Advisor for Hospitality and Leadership, Airbnb
 
“Developing talent is essential for business success. This book provides a practical and easy-to-implement approach that can have a big impact on an organization.”
—Tamar Elkeles, Chief Talent Executive, Atlantic Bridge Capital LLP
 
“This edition takes us into the realities of today's business landscape and shows that if we want to grow our business, we have to grow our people. It walks the reader through career conversations in a way that isn't overwhelming and rather focuses on leaders being genuine and having meaningful conversations.” 
—Robin Cerrati, Vice President, Human Resources, Compass Group
 
“Should be the career conversation bible for busy leaders!”
—Marshall Goldsmith, author of the New York Times bestseller Triggers andcoauthor of How Women Rise
 
“Organizations in Asia need to take career development initiatives seriously, and managers need to be supported with simple skills and tools to build trust and overcome cultural barriers. This book offers an approach to career development that works cross-culturally and enables companies in Asia to deal more effectively with this talent management challenge.”
—Tan Siew Inn, Founding Partner, The Flame Centre, Singapore, and author of Wholeness in a Disruptive World
 
Help Them Grow or Watch Them Go is an important contribution to leading organizations where people and talent growth matters to success.” 
—Kevin Wilde, Executive Leadership Fellow, Carlson School of Management
 
“In all my years coaching executives on career development, this is the best and most comprehensive resource available. It takes the complex issue of career development and simplifies it with real, action-oriented tips, tools, and insights. It's relevant for new supervisors, senior executives, and HR professionals at any level in any industry.”
—Sharon Silverman, Senior Vice President, Talent Acquisition, Gingerfinds
 
“At last, a hands-on book that's smart, practical, and honest. Everyone knows that people make all the difference; this book will teach you how to make a difference with your people.”
—Alan Webber, cofounder of Fast Company, author of Rules of Thumb, and Mayor of Santa Fe, New Mexico
 
“Improving the skills of our workforce is one of the country's most important economic challenges. It has to start with employers, and 
Help Them Grow tells you how to do it painlessly.” 
—Peter Cappelli, Director, Center for Human Resources, The Wharton School, and Professor of Management, University of Pennsylvania 
 
“Great read for those who want to help individuals develop. It is full of useful materials that are easy to access. Ideal for a manager who wants to learn about coaching others.”
—Edward E. Lawler III, Distinguished Professor of Business, Marshall School of Business, University of Southern California, and coauthor of Management Reset
 
“Improving retention and building engagement are the driving factors for the talent development strategy of the Hearst Capital Management group. We're implementing Help Them Grow concepts because they provide managers and employees with an easy-to-follow yet impactful framework for career conversations. Through career conversations, we're increasing engagement and, more importantly, supporting our employees' careers.”
—Heather Ragone, Senior Director, Talent Development, Hearst
 
“Ingersoll Rand's focus on development is improving year over year. Our leaders don't just coach for performance, they coach for development. How does best-in-class engagement and employee retention sound to you? Does an organization filled with career coaches sound interesting? Read this book!”
—Craig Mundy, Vice President, Human Resources, Strategic Business Units, Ingersoll Rand
 
Help Them Grow provides a practical road map for managers who know that they want to help their teams but may not know the clear, specific steps they can take. Managers, employees, and the organizations they serve will benefit from the wisdom in this book.”
 Rebecca L. Ray, Ph.D., Executive Vice President, Human Capital, The Conference Board
 
“I loved this book. Draw from the abundant list of simple yet powerful questions and become the best talent manager in your organization.” 
—Tina Sung, Vice President, Government Transformation and Agency Partnerships, Partnership for Public Service
 
“A great guidebook for those whose job it is to help other people grow, with all the right questions we need to be asking!”
—Frances Hesselbein, President and CEO, The Frances Hesselbein Leadership Institute

Back to Top ↑