Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace

Seven Steps to Renew Confidence, Commitment, and Energy

Dennis Reina (Author) | Michelle Reina (Author)

Publication date: 09/07/2010

Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace

Dennis and Michelle Reina provide a nuanced look at the dynamics of trust in workplace relationships, and how recover from betrayal.

  • The first book to focus specifically on recovering from workplace betrayals

  • Offers a proven process for restoring trust whether you have been betrayed, have committed a betrayal, or are helping someone through one

  • By the authors of the award-winning Trust and Betrayal in the Workplace

  • 2011 Axiom Silver Medal Winner in the Business Ethics Category
  • 2012 Natilus Silver Medal Winner in the Relationships Category


All work is conducted through relationships, and the key to relationships is trust. Yet trust is constantly being broken in the workplace. Sometime's it's in spectacular ways-CEOs cooking the books, workers laid off through no fault of their own, coworkers actively sabotaging others' work. But far more common, and more insidious, are the small betrayals we all have been guilty of, or subjected to, or both-things like gossiping, missing deadlines, taking credit for other people's work. Any betrayal, large or small, can end up sapping our energy, commitment and creativity.

The problem is people have no idea how to even begin restoring trust. Which is why Dennis and Michelle Reina's new book is so welcome. They offer a proven, straightforward seven step process that can be used by anyone who has been betrayed, who has committed a betrayal, or who wants to help someone work through a betrayal.

While there have been many books on recovering from betrayal in personal relationships, this is the first book to focus specifically on the workplace. It is firmly grounded in the Reinas twenty years of research on trust and their work with dozens of clients on trust-related issues. There are separate chapters on each of the Reina's Seven Steps for Healing, complete with trust tips, reflection questions, and practical how-to advice. And the Reinas share many stories of how trust had been broken and restored in all kinds of settings.

This work requires compassion and courage in equal measure. It's not easy, but this process frees you to once again give your organization your best thinking, highest intention and complete dedication. And as you move through the steps you will come to know yourself more deeply, which will help you succeed not only professionally, but personally as well.

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Overview

Dennis and Michelle Reina provide a nuanced look at the dynamics of trust in workplace relationships, and how recover from betrayal.

  • The first book to focus specifically on recovering from workplace betrayals

  • Offers a proven process for restoring trust whether you have been betrayed, have committed a betrayal, or are helping someone through one

  • By the authors of the award-winning Trust and Betrayal in the Workplace

  • 2011 Axiom Silver Medal Winner in the Business Ethics Category
  • 2012 Natilus Silver Medal Winner in the Relationships Category


All work is conducted through relationships, and the key to relationships is trust. Yet trust is constantly being broken in the workplace. Sometime's it's in spectacular ways-CEOs cooking the books, workers laid off through no fault of their own, coworkers actively sabotaging others' work. But far more common, and more insidious, are the small betrayals we all have been guilty of, or subjected to, or both-things like gossiping, missing deadlines, taking credit for other people's work. Any betrayal, large or small, can end up sapping our energy, commitment and creativity.

The problem is people have no idea how to even begin restoring trust. Which is why Dennis and Michelle Reina's new book is so welcome. They offer a proven, straightforward seven step process that can be used by anyone who has been betrayed, who has committed a betrayal, or who wants to help someone work through a betrayal.

While there have been many books on recovering from betrayal in personal relationships, this is the first book to focus specifically on the workplace. It is firmly grounded in the Reinas twenty years of research on trust and their work with dozens of clients on trust-related issues. There are separate chapters on each of the Reina's Seven Steps for Healing, complete with trust tips, reflection questions, and practical how-to advice. And the Reinas share many stories of how trust had been broken and restored in all kinds of settings.

This work requires compassion and courage in equal measure. It's not easy, but this process frees you to once again give your organization your best thinking, highest intention and complete dedication. And as you move through the steps you will come to know yourself more deeply, which will help you succeed not only professionally, but personally as well.

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Meet the Authors


Visit Author Page - Dennis Reina

Dennis Reina, PhD - together with his life and business partner Michelle Reina, PhD - is Co-Founder of Reina, A Trust Building® Consultancy, a global firm specializing in transforming workplaces through trust. Considered a pioneer in his field, Dennis's focus for 25 years has been researching trust and developing tools to assess and measurably strengthen trust in workplace relationships. Leaders, teams, and organizations such as American Express, Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Lincoln Financial Group, and Walt Disney World leverage Reina’s comprehensive trust building system - which includes consulting, speaking, and coaching - not only to build trust, but also to rebuild trust and work productively again. Dennis is co-author of two business bestselling books, Trust & Betrayal in the Workplace, 3rd ed. (Berret Koehler, 1999, 2006, 2015) and Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace (Berret-Koehler, 2010). Reina's books are the definitive guides for building and sustaining highly effective relationships that produce results.



Visit Author Page - Michelle Reina

Michelle Reina, PhD - together with her life and busines partner Dennis Reina, PhD - is Co-Founder of Reina, A Trust Building® Consultancy, a global firm specializing in transforming workplaces through trust. Considered a pioneer in her field, Michelle's focus for 25 years has been researching trust and developing tools to assess and measurably strengthen trust in workplace relationships. Leaders, teams, and organizations such as American Express, Johns Hopkins Medical Center, Lincoln Financial Group, and Walt Disney World leverage Reina’s comprehensive trust building system - which includes consulting, speaking, and coaching - not only to build trust, but also to rebuild trust and work productively again. Michelle is co-author of two business bestselling books, Trust & Betrayal in the Workplace, 3rd ed. (Berret Koehler, 1999, 2006, 2015) and Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace (Berret-Koehler, 2010). Reina's books are the definitive guides for building and sustaining highly effective relationships that produce results.

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Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction: Betrayal is Universal

Step 1: Observe and Acknowledge What Happened

Step 2: Allow Feelings to Surface

Step 3: Get and Give Support

Step 4: Reframe the Experience

Step 5: Take Responsibility

Step 6: Forgive Yourself and Others

Step 7: Let Go and Move On

Conclusion: Renewing Confidence, Commitment, and Energy

Notes

Acknowledgments

Index

About the Authors

Working with the Authors

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Excerpt

Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace

INTRODUCTION
Betrayal Is Universal

The vulnerability of trust is always present, even in high-trust relationships. Since business is transacted through relationships, it follows that you will experience times at work when trust is broken—sometimes obviously, and sometimes not so obviously. Each and every day, small but hurtful situations accumulate over time into confidence-busting, commitment-breaking, energy-draining patterns consistent with broken trust. People feel hurt, disappointed, let down, and frustrated. The feelings can be as strong as resentment, bitterness, antipathy, and even betrayal.

Betrayal is not our word. It is the word used by the thousands of people we have worked with who have taught us about trust. Betrayal is often viewed as a dark, negative word that triggers painful memories. But when trust has been broken, people often feel betrayed. That is the simple truth. It is also true that every single one of us has been betrayed and has betrayed others. Betrayal is universal. People have been betrayed by bosses, subordinates, co-workers. There is betrayal in families, friendships, neighborhoods, social groups, religious institutions, schools, and universities. The ways trust is broken aren’t always immediate or obvious. Let’s start by learning more about the forms betrayal takes.

image

The Betrayal Continuum

Betrayal occurs on a continuum from unintentional to intentional and from minor to major. Intentional betrayal is a self-serving action committed with the purpose of hurting, damaging, or harming another person. Unintentional betrayal is the by-product of a self-serving or careless action that has the same result.

Major betrayals impact you immediately and dramatically at your deepest core. At work, major betrayal is often associated with mismanaged change related to reorganizations, shifts in strategy, mergers, acquisitions, and layoffs. On a more interpersonal level, a major betrayal may occur through a single act, such as violating a confidence or telling a lie. Major intentional betrayals are often the outcomes of fear and self-serving interests and include situations in which people:

image Deliberately fail to honor their commitments

image Knowingly withhold information

image Deceive fellow co-workers

image Sabotage others’ work to further their own ends

Major intentional betrayals are hurtful, ill-intended words or actions that break down trusting relationships. As one concerned employee told us, “It is especially painful when you are stabbed in the back without warning by those closest to you. It knocks you off your feet.”

Common Workplace Minor Betrayals

image Gossiping or talking about others behind their backs

image Consistently arriving late for meetings

image Not responding to requests made by others

image Hoarding pertinent, job-related information

image Not returning phone calls or answering email requests

image Finger pointing and blaming

image Covering up mistakes

image Discourteous, insensitive, or rude behavior

image Taking credit for others’ work

Many unintentional minor betrayals have to do with abdicating responsibility. These are subtle situations in which someone tries to let him or herself off the hook by:

image Telling a white lie

image Not fully disclosing information

image Condoning or not responding to someone else’s inappropriate behavior

image Not owning his or her part of problem

image Allowing his or her co-workers or reports to fail when he or she could have stepped in and helped.

While major betrayals decisively break trust, minor unintentional betrayals that erode trust over time are more pervasive. Take a look at the box for examples of such common behaviors. Our research shows that 90 percent of employees experience these types of betrayal frequently. But instead of dealing directly with these transgressions, people let them go unaddressed. Importantly, however, they do not go unnoticed. The net result of the accumulation of minor betrayals is major: people mentally and emotionally check out. They may wait it out until the economy improves to walk out the door. In the meantime, they become the “working wounded,” those who do as little as they can to get away with, no more, no less. Relationships fall apart and everyone loses.

How you position an experience along the betrayal continuum depends on the degree to which you perceive that the individual was self-serving or careless and the degree of hurt, damage, or pain actually inflicted. For instance, someone accepting credit for someone else’s work may be a minor intentional betrayal in one circumstance, but if the person who falsely accepts credit does so knowing that he will gain greatly at the other’s expense, it is a major intentional betrayal. We recently worked with a leader who lost a promotional opportunity because a co-worker took full credit for her work. This lost opportunity represented a major betrayal.

The Impact of Betrayal

No matter its source, betrayal can rock you to your core and strike at the very center of your humanness. When you are vulnerable, your feelings are raw. You may feel sick to your stomach, have frequent headaches, or be more susceptible to illness. You may feel broken. You lose your footing, withdraw, pull back, disengage, and contract. In your contraction, you become hesitant and reluctant to trust others and yourself. You doubt yourself, question your own trustworthiness, and contemplate your sense of belonging. You wonder, who can I trust, who can’t I trust? Who can I believe, who can’t I believe? Your sense of self and identity flounders. You ask, what did I do to deserve this, who am I, and what do I have to offer?

In short, when you feel betrayed, you lose the confidence, commitment, and energy that keep relationships together, fuel your performance, and feed your satisfaction at work. Let’s take these one at a time:

Confidence:

“A co-worker is always speaking over me in discussions or when we make group presentations. I try to contribute but I struggle to make myself heard. I hold back my opinions because I feel like my co-workers place no value in what I have to say. I feel insecure and lack confidence in my opinions and my value to the company.”

When someone has betrayed you, you lose confidence in that person. If you feel betrayed by your company, you lose confidence in your leadership and sometimes in your colleagues. Over time, with repeated occurrences, you lose confidence in yourself. You begin to question and doubt your competence and your judgment of others. You then are no longer willing to take risks or put in extra effort.

Commitment

“Everyone on our team is constantly forwarding their own interests and pushing hidden agendas. I guess it’s probably not the best way to work, but experience has taught me that this is the only way to get what I want. If I stop looking out for myself, someone around me will take advantage of it, and I won’t be able to obtain the resources I need to do my work. I’m sorry, but at this point, I have to focus on looking out for myself, because no one else will. I feel alienated, isolated, and forced to act in a manner against my core values.”

When someone betrays you, you question your commitment to that relationship. When that relationship is at work, the lack of commitment seeps into your commitment to your team, organization, and career. You simply don’t care anymore about the organization’s mission, your team’s goals, or maybe even about your customers or other constituents you serve. You’re ready to leave whenever you get a better offer. You may even be aware of losing connection and commitment to your own values; in other words, you begin to betray yourself as well.

Energy

“Every time I write something, my boss completely rewrites it. I don’t understand why he even has me write it in the first place. At this point, I don’t even make an effort when drafting up a document, because I know he’s going to change the entire thing anyway. It is the most annoying behavior I have ever experienced in the workplace, but there is nothing I can do about it because he’s my boss. I feel devalued and unable to make meaningful contribution. I’m just going through the motions and am so tired when I get home.”

Betrayal is energy-depleting and trust is energy-producing. Trust begets trust, and betrayal begets betrayal. When you feel betrayed, it’s natural to want to betray the other person back. Betrayal is energy-depleting because you spend what energy you do have plotting negative moves or retreating into a survival mode focused on self-preservation. You become distracted from your job and distanced from your colleagues. You lose sight of what used to motivate you, so work becomes a chore that wears you down.

Betrayals large and small heighten your awareness of trust-related issues and bring you an opportunity for self-discovery and renewal. Pursuing that opportunity is a choice you make consciously. You can choose to remain depleted, without confidence, commitment, or energy or you can choose to renew by being curious and open to learning, growing, and becoming self-aware.

Betrayal: A Gift and a Teacher

Every failure, obstacle, or hardship is an opportunity in disguise. Success in many cases is failure turned inside out.”

—Mary Kay Ash
American businessperson

We know it’s hard to choose the path of renewal. When you have been betrayed, you often feel helpless and hopeless. You experience doubt and confusion, question your self-worth and your sense of belonging, and are in pain. You may feel as though you have no control over what was “done to you.”

When you remain angry, bitter, or resentful and assume the posture of a victim, you lock into a focus on others’ actions. You become consumed in what “they did to you,” and allow their actions to eat away at your spirit. Over time your resentment grows and self-pity sets in. You may even choose to betray intentionally in return because “they deserve it.” Others experience you as arrogant, self-serving, and irresponsible. You are not a person others want to be around or work with.

Alternatively, you may choose to embrace the pain of betrayal. This choice takes you on a journey of healing and renewal. On this journey, you replace anger and bitterness with compassion. Through compassion, you seek to understand your pain and to work through it to heal and to deepen your understanding of your relationships with yourself and with others. You extend the benefit of the doubt and are willing to hear alternate perspectives. You are curious about insights that may come. With courage, you may even ask yourself if you may have contributed in some way to what occurred.

Through healing, you become:

image More self-aware

image More deeply compassionate

image More self-confident

image Open to learn more about life, people, and relationships

You become a person others want to work with because they know they will have permission to be human when they are around you.

When you deny yourself the opportunity to heal from your pain, you betray yourself. You erode your life force. You rob yourself of insights, lessons, your restored capacity for trust, and potential future opportunities. You rob yourself of yourself. When you choose to embrace your pain and work through it, you regain your wholeness. As a participant said during one of our Trust Building1 programs, “I am grateful for my experiences of betrayal because of how they contributed to the person I am today. They led me to the relationships I hold most precious and to the place I am in my life.”

In this way, betrayal can be a teacher. When you heal and renew, you transform yourself, your relationships, your organizations, and the world around you.

The Three Vantage Points

You can learn from betrayal, whether you have been betrayed, have betrayed someone else, or want to help others work through betrayal. In this book, we provide information relevant to all vantage points at the beginning of each chapter, and then we give information and advice that is specific to each of these vantage points. Because human relationships are systems, it is unlikely that you will ever fall into just one of these categories. If you are honest with yourself when someone has breached your trust, you will often find that you also betrayed that person or yourself. And when you become cognizant of your behavior that betrayed another, you may also discover that you were reacting to having been betrayed by that person, or by someone else entirely. Often, we find that people engage in trust-breaking behavior at work when they have been betrayed at home. Betrayal, as we’ve said, begets betrayal.

Because broken trust is so pervasive in the workplace, it is likely that you see it around you even if you don’t feel directly involved in it. We are often asked by caring people who are concerned about other individuals or the overall work environment what they can do to help others rebuild trust. We applaud the intentions and courage of these people. If you are one of them, we first point you to the material about what to do when you feel betrayed. Why? Because you cannot be an instrument for healing and rebuilding trust if you are currently troubled by (or suffering from) unresolved pain yourself. It’s likely that as you help others, your own feelings will surface. Those feelings may be related to what you see in the workplace, or they may be feelings you carry from home or even from your childhood. Be prepared to go on your own journey as you set out to accompany others on theirs. Others have to see you as trustworthy before they will open up to you and be willing to receive your help.

The Seven Steps for Healing

The man who does things makes mistakes, but he never makes the biggest mistake of all—doing nothing.”

—Benjamin Franklin
Statesman, scientist, and one of
America’s founding fathers

Whether you are feeling betrayed, coming to terms with having betrayed another, or simply trying to help, the Seven Steps for Healing2 will provide a process to achieve renewal.

The Seven Steps for Healing model is universal. It emerged out of Dennis’s experience with some of the most basic sources of betrayal: broken promises, dishonesty, and abandonment. He found value in understanding the reasons bad things happened, in integrating the lessons to be learned, in forgiving himself and his betrayer, and in letting go and moving on.

My world came crashing down. I came back from a four-day doctorate research session and discovered that my wife had been having an affair with a co-worker for six months. I was stunned, confused, and disoriented. I was angry and upset. But most of all, I questioned myself: How could I not have noticed?

I loved my wife and our two little boys. For the year and a half after discovering the affair, I did whatever I could to hold the marriage together. I went to counseling to work through my issues and the pain of my failing marriage, but my wife was not willing to join me in this effort.

We worked out an amicable divorce agreement and were awarded joint custody of our boys. While I had my boys on alternating weekends, some holidays and vacations, I lost the life with them that I had cherished.

A very painful part of the early years after the divorce were my long and sad rides home after dropping the boys off at the end of their weekends with me. I cried so hard, I often had to pull over to the side of the road because I couldn’t see straight to drive.

The Seven Steps for Healing

1. Observe and acknowledge what happened
Observe the situation to become aware of what happened, and then fully acknowledge the impact on you, others, and your relationships. When you are betrayed, you often experience the impact as a loss: the loss of what was or the loss of what could have been. For healing to take place, you need to acknowledge that loss.

2. Allow feelings to surface
Express your feelings, whether they are anger, disappointment, hurt, sadness, fear, guilt, or confusion. Give yourself permission to feel upset. Find appropriate ways to release your emotions and give voice to your pain. Allowing your feelings to surface brings about a “release” that allows you to begin to work through your hurt and supports the healing process.

3. Get and give support
Identify support that will help you to recognize where you are stuck or struggling. Support helps you to move from blaming to problem solving. It helps you to move from being “the victim” to taking responsibility for yourself, your job, and your life so that you grow from the experience. You can find support within yourself or from other people.

4. Reframe the experience
Use your hurt and pain as stepping stones for healing. Consider the bigger picture, and what might have been going on for the other person involved and for you. Examine the choices and opportunities you now have. Find the purpose of this event in your life and tease out what you can learn about yourself, others, and relationships.

5. Take responsibility
Courageously look at what part you may have played in what happened. You are not responsible for what was done to you, but you are responsible for how you chose to respond. Consider what you could have done differently, what actions you can take now to change the situation, and the gains you make by taking responsibility.

6. Forgive yourself and others
Compassionately ask what needs to happen for forgiveness to take place. Reflect on how this betrayal occurred. Forgiveness does not mean excusing the offending behavior but rather observing how the betrayal has affected you and others. Consider again your feelings surrounding the betrayal, and decide to release yourself from the burden of carrying those feelings.

7. Let go and move on
Ask what needs to be said or done to put this experience behind you. You do not forget the betrayal or fail to protect yourself from further betrayals. There is a difference between remembering and “hanging on,” and remembering so as to help yourself and others by drawing on the lessons learned. Stronger and more self-aware than you were before the trust was broken, you look forward rather than backward. You choose to act differently as you integrate and celebrate your learning.

This intense pain continued for quite some time before subsiding. What I was grieving was the loss of my daily life with my sons—the loss of what could have been, but now would never be. I missed tucking the boys into bed every night, rubbing their backs as they dozed off to sleep. I missed making them breakfast and putting them on the school bus.

In my grieving, I needed to allow my feelings to surface, to release my anger, my hurt, and my deep pain. And I did, again and again.

While living this chapter of my life was a nightmare, years later I was able to see its enormously redeeming value. A powerful lesson for me was that while I felt victimized, I certainly did not need to remain a victim. I chose to work through my pain and learned a lot about myself. I became more sensitive to others in pain, and how I could help them.

Through my healing, I was eventually led to my future wife and business partner, Michelle. Together, we developed the work that we do today. And my healing gave birth to the framework of these Seven Steps for Healing.

The other basis for the Seven Steps for Healing model is the extensive research on the grieving process. Experiencing a betrayal has much in common with experiencing a death. There is a sense of loss. Healing after a betrayal, as after a death, requires us to move through a series of emotions. In her examination of death and dying, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross defined the steps of the grieving process as shock, anger, denial, rationalization, depression, and acceptance.3 Our Seven Steps for Healing model (see box and figure) tells you how to take action to work through the feelings Kübler-Ross observed. These Steps show a manageable path to help you acknowledge and move through your hurt, with support, to reframe your experience, take responsibility, let go, and move on. Through the Seven Steps you will learn the lessons that betrayal has to teach you about relationships, life, and yourself.

Healing is a process that can’t be short-circuited. The effects of broken trust won’t go away on their own volition; you have to work through the process of healing. We have all been victims and been betrayed, we have all been perpetrators and betrayed others, and we all have a general desire to help others. No matter where you start, the Seven Steps for Healing are intended to serve as a framework to help you work through the painful feelings of betrayal toward rebuilding the trust that will restore your confidence and commitment and reignite your energy.

Each of the Seven Steps represents a phase of the healing process. Although they are numbered sequentially, people do not necessarily work through them in a linear fashion. You may be experiencing multiple Steps at the same time; it is very common to work on observation and acknowledgment (Step One) at the same time as you are allowing your feelings to surface (Step Two) and seeking support (Step Three). Only the starting point, awareness (Step One), is fixed. You may complete one Step and move to the next, only to re-experience aspects of the earlier Step. Feelings come in waves; there are highs and lows, ebbs and flows. All of that is movement toward healing.

image

There is no comparison between that which is lost by not succeeding and that which is lost by not trying.”

—Francis Bacon
British statesman and philosopher

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Endorsements

The definitive book on sustaining trust in your organization. Dennis and Michelle Reina have created a practical manual for understanding, building, and rebuilding trust in working relationships.”
—Paul Rosner, Chief Information Officer, Energy Coal, BHP Billiton, Sydney, Australia

“The Reinas' true-to-life stories inspired me to reframe broken trust and arrive in a place of renewed energy and understanding.”
—Peggy Niemer, Corporate Vice President, Human Resources, Children's Hospital and Health System

“Dennis and Michelle demonstrate their profound understanding of the human spirit and human frailties—and their ability to step back and observe the strengths that can come from both. I believe this book is for everyone in relationships everywhere, not just those in the workplace.”
—Stephen H. Rhinesmith, PhD, coauthor of Head, Heart, and Guts

“Michelle and Dennis Reina are at the forefront of helping leaders understand the importance of trust in building high performance organizations. 
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace presents actionable concepts that leaders can put to immediate use in rebuilding trust in relationships in the workplace as well as at home.”
—Deborah Garrett, Vice President, Human Resources, Intuit

“The principles in this book have had an important and valuable influence on how members of our team talk to each other, how we treat each other, and how we expect to be treated by others. The Reinas' work has given us a gift that allowed us to move forward. We found a path to becoming better individuals and teammates.” 
—David J. Whaley, Vice President, Development and Alumni Relations, Norwich University

“As organizations become more diverse, trust emerges as a critical prerequisite for the conversations necessary to align different world views in support of a common mission and vision.
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace breaks this seemingly complex issue into kaizen-like steps that can help employees, supervisors, and leaders effectively manage and best leverage a multicultural workforce.”
—Harry R. Gibbs, MD, Chief Diversity Officer, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston

“Given that trust is fragile—it can be built and broken—knowing how to rebuild trust is essential.
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace offers practical advice and guidance for how to build and bolster trust. And effective leaders know that trust is the foundation for the kind of engagement that drives high quality, sustainable results.”
—Sue Hoffman, Program Manager, Talent Acquisition, 3M

“As a multi-dimensional non-profit agency, we see the demand for our services at an all-time high. With pressure on staff and stress in relationships peaking, I will use this book daily in my work with managers and our teams. I know its advice will produce great results.”
 —Jill C. Dagilis Executive Director, Worcester Community Action Council

“By applying the Reinas' proven methods and tools for rebuilding trust, you will come to learn more about yourself and others. You will also learn how to create and sustain the strong relationships that are necessary to navigate today's complex environment. Read this practical, easy-to-read book and turn the elusive trust we all seek into reality!”
—Kate Beatty, Director, Global Portfolio Management, Center for Creative Leadership

“Trust is a fragile thing—easy to break and hard to repair—but rebuilding trust is a job you cannot ignore if you want a thriving workplace.  Don't miss this book.  The trust you rebuild may be in yourself.” 
—John Kador, author of Effective Apology

“This book speaks to managers as imperfect beings—the reality is that in our work organizations, we have the potential to inadvertently be on both sides of a complex trust issue, feeling betrayed and instigating betrayal.  
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace not only explains this paradox but also shows how to reflect internally and then take action.”
—Thom Johnston, President, New England School of Communications

“Workplace trust is at an all-time low. Fortunately there is help within the pages of 
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace.  Dennis and Michelle Reina adeptly describe the issues underpinning the loss of trust while giving readers ways to reframe their thinking. The authors also provide pragmatic steps that can be put to use immediately to rebuild trust among coworkers.”
—Jon Peters, President, The Institute for Management Studies

“There has never been a greater sense of the loss of trust in the religious community than there is today. Every congregational member or clergy leader has found himself or herself at one or more of the vantage points of betrayal outlined in
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace, whether we realize it or not, for broken trust is all around us. Thank goodness we now have a road map in the form of this approachable, compassionate book.”
—Rev. Phill Martin, CAE, CCA, Deputy CEO, National Association of Church Business Administration

“Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace is equally powerful in both one-on-one relationships and group settings. A central theme in the book involves taking responsibility, whether you are the betrayer or the victim, in order to move forward in the healing process. The book offers practical yet thought-provoking advice and provides an excellent framework for rebuilding trust.”
—Barbara Kimmel, Executive Director, Trust Across America

“Dennis and Michelle Reina walk the reader through a process that can lead beyond personal feelings and reactions to effective resolution. This book addresses a very important missing link in most companies' handling of human resource issues!”
—Randy Spencer, Vice President for Residential Services, Presbyterian Children's Homes & Services

Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace is a very useful guide that provides an easy-to-understand process, a helpful framework, a variety of real-world examples, useful tips and memorable quotations. I appreciated the well-rounded perspective that addresses both the betrayed and betrayer, invokes both compassion and courage, and details how to give to yourself and others.”
—Simon Hayward, Managing Partner, Cirrus, Cheshire, UK

“This book will help individuals heal their relationships with intention and courage. It provides a proven path to reclaim trust and restore the relationships that underpin satisfaction, performance, and achievement at work.”
—Leslie Yerkes, President, Catalyst Consulting Group, Inc. and Adjunct Faculty member, Case Western Reserve University, and author of Fun Works and They Just Don't Get It!

“As a leader, I'm always looking for tools that will help supervisors, whether at the executive level or on the front lines, be the best managers they can be. In this book, I found such a tool. Its practical model and real-life stories make it accessible and effective for anyone tackling the challenge of broken trust.”
—Ted A. Mayer, Executive Director, Harvard University Hospitality and Dining Services

“Rebuilding trust should be a competency required of all leaders and all individual contributors across all organizations. Dennis and Michelle Reina tell us how to hone the skills that will prepare us to repair damaged relationships. All who read
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace will come away with a deeper understanding of themselves and a greater appreciation of others.”
—Beverly Kaye, Founder and CEO, Career Systems International and coauthor of Love ‘Em or Lose ‘Em

“Do you have a hard time winning back the hearts of your employees? Has your team become paranoid? Do you wonder what to do and where to start? If so, your top priority should be reading
Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace. You'll find valuable insights to spot trust-breakers and practical tips to shepherd the healing process.”
—Philippe Masson, Founding Partner and President, MyDevelopment.Pro, Paris, France

“We all know that people, performance and profits suffer when trust is broken. Dennis and Michelle Reina provide step-by-step guidance for healing personally and organizationally. Follow their sage advice to re-establish leadership credibility and create a positive emotional environment in your organization.”
—Diana Whitney, PhD, President, Corporation for Positive Change and author of Appreciative Leadership

“Trust is at the core of the best schools I have worked in and visited, and it is evident in each school's top educators and administrators. Yet it's hard to imagine a group of organizations more in need of trust rebuilding than our public schools. I hope all schools tap into this book, for Dennis and Michelle provide clear, proven steps on strengthening the trustful relationships that are essential among students, teachers, parents, and administrators.”
—Heidi Berlyak, Owner, LearningReviews.com

Rebuilding Trust in the Workplace is likely to be one of the most important books on workplace relationships you will ever read.  Full of compelling and moving real life examples, it speaks directly to you, draws you in and makes you feel part of the story. There were times, in fact, when I thought I was the person they were writing about.   Dennis and Michelle Reina are exceptional coaches who walk you through a proven process. From the first page to the last, you will find useful things you can do immediately to heal a broken relationship and steer it back to one that's renewing and productive. Do yourself a big favor and buy this book now, read it tonight, and put it to use tomorrow. You'll thank yourself and so will those you work with.”
—Jim Kouzes, coauthor of The Leadership Challenge and The Truth About Leadership and Dean's Executive Professor of Leadership, Leavey School of Business, Santa Clara University

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